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Tips for Cleaning Lingual Braces

May 23rd, 2019

Lingual braces are a lot like regular braces, but they have brackets and wires on the inside of the teeth instead of the outside. Why choose this type of appliance? Because lingual braces offer some benefits other braces don’t.

Lingual braces are almost invisible to the people around you. If you’re involved in a contact sport, they are much less likely to contact your lips and mouth. (But you should still wear a mouthguard!) If you play a reed or brass instrument, they won’t have as much impact on your lips, your mouth, and your performance. And, did we mention they’re almost invisible?

Just like regular braces, lingual braces require careful cleaning to protect your teeth from staining, plaque and cavities. But because the brackets are located on the inside of the teeth, making sure your teeth are their cleanest can be a bit more challenging. Here are some suggestions for making your life with lingual braces a little easier.

  • Think Small

Because you will be working on the inside of your mouth, a brush with a smaller head might be more maneuverable (and more comfortable!) in a tighter space. If you use an electric toothbrush, look for a head attachment in a smaller size or one especially designed for orthodontic appliances.

And for the tiniest spaces, use the tiniest brushes. Interdental brushes, also called interproximal brushes, can fit between your wires to clean around brackets as well as removing plaque between teeth.

  • Thread Alert

How to get that floss under the wire? Special tools called floss threaders can help get your dental floss where it needs to be. Or try one of the flosses meant for braces wearers, which offer pre-cut strands with a stiff tip at one end to thread between teeth and through wires more easily.

  • Top Picks

For removing food particles and plaque between teeth, try interdental soft picks. These have a flexible, textured pick at the tip to fit gently into smaller, tighter spaces. They are also easy to carry on the go if you aren’t able to floss.

  • Water Power

Water flossers use a pulsing stream of water to clean between and around teeth. If you find it very difficult to floss around your lingual brackets, this might be a good option. Make sure any model you choose has a seal of approval, and has been tested for safety and effectiveness.

  • Keep Current

Remember to keep up with your regular appointments at our Logan, Smithfield, Providence, and Preston, UT office. It’s especially important to care for your mouth and teeth while you are wearing braces.

No matter what type of appliance you use, get in the habit of cleaning your teeth and braces after every meal and snack.  You will be rewarded with a beautiful and healthy smile when your orthodontic work is completed—and that’s the greatest benefit of all!

What are the benefits of early orthodontic treatment?

May 22nd, 2019

Orthodontic treatment should begin earlier than most parents are apt to assume. According to the American Association of Orthodontists, orthodontic treatment should start at around seven years of age.

Drs. Craig Willis, Morris L. Poole, and Morris N. Poole can evaluate your child’s existing and incoming teeth early on to determine whether treatment might be necessary or not.

What is early orthodontic treatment?

Early orthodontic treatment usually begins when a child is eight or nine years old. In stage one, bite problems such as underbites and the jaw’s growth pattern are corrected. It can also help to make room in the mouth for the permanent teeth to take their proper places as they come in, which reduces the chance that the patient will require extractions later, due to overcrowding.

Does your child need early orthodontic treatment?

If you notice any of the following characteristics in your son or daughter, you may want to have a chat with Drs. Craig Willis, Morris L. Poole, and Morris N. Poole.

  • Early loss of baby teeth (before age five)
  • Late loss of baby teeth (after age five or six)
  • Your child’s teeth do not meet properly or at all
  • Your child is a mouth breather
  • Front teeth are crowded (you probably wouldn’t see this until your child is about seven or eight)
  • Protruding teeth, typically in the front
  • Biting or chewing difficulties
  • A speech impediment
  • Your child’s jaw shifts when he or she opens or closes the mouth
  • Your child is older than five years and still sucks a thumb

 

What are the benefits of seeking orthodontic treatment early?

There are many benefits to early orthodontic treatment. One of the biggest is that, because a child’s jaw and bones are soft and pliable, corrective procedures such as braces can work much faster than they do for adults.

Treatment at our Logan, Smithfield, Providence, and Preston, UT office can enable your child to avoid lengthy procedures, extraction, or surgery in adulthood. Early orthodontic care will give your son or daughter a healthy, stable smile.

My toothbrush did what?

May 16th, 2019

If you were to put your toothbrush bristles under a high-powered microscope, what you would see might give you nightmares: millions of bacteria, busily crawling up and down your toothbrush bristles, consuming proteins that came from your mouth, and still clinging to the bristles even after you’ve rinsed them with water.

Rinsing your toothbrush after brushing removes some of those ferociously hungry bacteria, but not all. The American Dental Association says that bacterial infestations develop on toothbrushes within a month of daily use. The ADA also states that unless a toothbrush is sterilized before being packaged, it’s going to come with bacteria – free of charge!

Germs and Frayed Bristles: the Demise of a Toothbrush

Drs. Craig Willis, Morris L. Poole, and Morris N. Poole and our staff recommend that you toss your old toothbrush in the trash and purchase a new one every three months. Children tend to bite on their toothbrushes, which makes the bristles degrade and fray faster. Chances are kids may need to have their toothbrushes changed more frequently.

Where do they hide?

Bacteria are tenacious little germs that head for those concealed areas between toothbrush bristles. They are highly adaptable and exist in every type of extreme environment. Some people actually go so far as to put their toothbrush in a microwave for a few seconds to kill germs, but this doesn't always work either. In fact, you may only end up with a toothbrush that’s as bendable as a Gumby doll – and still covered with germs.

Feed a Cold, Starve a Fever, and Get Rid of Your Toothbrush

When you have a head cold, your mouth is teeming with bacteria gleefully roaming around, and gobbling mucus and dead skin cells. If you brush your teeth while suffering a sinus condition, the brush will act like a magnet for ravenous bacteria. Use your old toothbrush while you are sick, but as soon as you feel better, throw it away and get a new one. Otherwise you could possibly re-infect yourself with the same cold germs!

What is a palatal expander?

May 15th, 2019

Orthodontists like Drs. Craig Willis, Morris L. Poole, and Morris N. Poole recommend a first orthodontic visit and evaluation for your child around the age of seven. We will evaluate your child’s jaw and facial development and make sure that there is enough room in the mouth for the permanent teeth when they arrive. One of the recommendations we might make for early treatment is the use of a palatal expander. If you are unfamiliar with this device, let’s take a closer look at why it’s necessary and what exactly it does.

Why do we recommend the palatal expander?

There are two dental arches, composed of the upper and the lower teeth, in your child’s mouth. This arch-shaped design is meant to accommodate all the permanent teeth. Further, when the upper and lower teeth meet, they should result in a healthy occlusion, or bite.

Sometimes, the upper dental arch is simply too small to accommodate all of your child’s permanent teeth, leading to crowding, extractions, and impacted teeth. Also, a too-narrow arch can result in a crossbite, where some of the upper teeth bite inside the lower ones. An improper bite can lead to problems such as TMJ (temporomandibular joint) disorder, improper wear and stress on teeth, certain speech difficulties, and other potential complications. The palatal expander was designed to prevent these problems from occurring.

What is a palatal expander and how does it work?

The expander itself is a device that increases the size of the upper dental arch. Before your child’s bones are finished growing, the space between the two bones of the upper palate is filled with cartilage. This tissue is flexible when children are young, but gradually fuses solidly into place by the time they are finished growing (usually in the early to mid-teens). If the arch can be widened to accommodate the emerging permanent teeth, or to reduce malocclusions, this improvement can also affect the need for, and length of, future dental work.

There are several types of expanders available at our Logan, Smithfield, Providence, and Preston, UT office. These are custom-made appliances, commonly attached between the upper teeth on each side of the jaw. The two halves of the device are connected with a screw-type mechanism that can be adjusted to widen the upper palate and dental arch with gentle pressure. This is a gradual process, with small adjustments usually made once or twice a day to slowly move the bones further apart. As weeks go by, you will notice a successful change in the spacing of the teeth. Your child might even develop a gap in the front teeth, which is normal and will generally close on its own.

If you would like more detailed information, talk to Drs. Craig Willis, Morris L. Poole, and Morris N. Poole about the palate expander. We can tell you what to expect from this treatment if we think it is best for your child’s unique needs, and how to make it as easy as possible for your child. Our goal is to provide your child with the healthiest teeth and bite possible, always making use of treatments that are both gentle and effective.

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